Course Medieval Latin for PhDs and RMAs

Course Medieval Latin for PhDs and RMAs

 

Prof. dr. Els Rose, Utrecht University

Netherlands Research School for Medieval Studies

 

Meetings: eight meetings of 3 hours each, including the exam, on Fridays 11.00-14.00 at Utrecht University

Planning: 4, 18, 25 May and 1, 8, 15, 22, 29 June 2019

Study Load: 5 ECTS

Exam: 29 June 2019

 

Please register before 1 February 2019 by filling in the form below and returning it to the Research School.

 

Latin was the main language of communication in the medieval West. The written expression of this language underwent important changes compared to the classical Latin of Roman antiquity, both in the grammatical categories and with regard to text types and genres.

 

The course provides an introduction to medieval Latin, its linguistic development, the continuation of classical genres, and the development of new types of texts. During class sessions we will read and discuss texts that represent central components of medieval life and culture, while secondary literature will support our reading of these source texts. The course is concluded by a written exam.

 

The course outline is flexible and can be adapted to the specific needs and interests of the participants. Basic knowledge of the Latin grammar is required.

 

For questions with regard to contents please contact Els Rose (h.g.e.rose@uu.nl)

 

Name: ……………………………………………………

 

RMA – PhD *

 

University: ……………………………………………………

 

Knowledge of Latin: basic – advanced *

 

I have a specific interest in the following kinds of Latin texts:

 

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* Please delete as applicable

 

 

A possible outline, adaptable to specific needs and wishes expressed by participants

 

Class 1 Introduction to medieval Latin: its role in medieval culture

Source Reading: Beda, Historia ecclesiastica gentis anglorum

Secondary Literature: Jan Ziolkowskii, ‘Towards a History of Medieval Latin Literature’, in F.A.C. Mantello and A.G. Rigg, Medieval Latin: An Introduction and Bibliographical Guide (Washington DC, 1996), 505-536

 

Class 2 Introduction to medieval Latin: its linguistic characteristics

Source Reading: Gregory the Great and Gregory of Tours

Secondary Literature: Alison Goddard Elliott, ‘A Brief Introduction to Medieval Latin Grammar’, in Kay Pomeroy Harrington (ed.), revised by Joseph Pucci (Chicago and London, 1997), 1-51

 

Class 3 Medieval Latin in the biblical and extra-biblical tradition

Source Reading: Sedulius, Carmen paschale; Gospel of Nicodemus 

Secondary Literature: Michael Roberts, Rémi Gounelle, Zbigniew Izydorczyk

 

Class 4 Medieval Latin and the transmission of knowledge

Source Reading: Boethius, De consolatione philosophiae and Isidore of Seville, Etymologiae IX.4

Secondary Literature: Ernst Robert Curtius, ‘Etymology as a Category of Thought’, in European Literature and the Latin Middle Ages (transl. 1990), 495-500

 

Class 5 Medieval Latin Poetry: Satire and Sacrament

Source Reading: The Goliardic verse; hymns for Corpus Christi

Secondary Literature: Laura Kendrick, ‘Medieval Satire’, in Ruben Quintero, A Companion to Satire (Malden etc. 2007), 52-69; and/or Margaret Rose, Parody: Ancient, Modern and Post-Modern (Cambridge, 1993)

 

Class 6 Pragmatic writing: Letters and Charters

Source Reading: students’ letters of the twelfth century, a papal charter    

Secondary Literature: Richard Sharpe, ‘Charters, deeds, and diplomatics’, in Mantello & Higg, 230-240

 

Class 7 Medieval Latin visionary literature

Source Reading: Hildegard of Bingen and Brigitta of Sweden

Secondary Literature: Beverly Kienzle, Hildegard of Bingen, Homilies on the Gospels (Collegeville, MN, 2011); Anna Fredriksson, The Council of Constance, Jean Gerson, and St. Birgitta's Revelaciones, in : Medieval Studies 76 (2014) 217-239

 

Class 8: Exam